2014-08-01 23:21:00 UTC

Gastroenterology Podcast August 2014: Factors That Could Affect Colorectal Cancer Screening Strategies

A study in the August issue of Gastroenterology found little benefit to repeat colonoscopies within ten years of screening where no polyps were originally found. A related study by the same group found that age, sex, race, and ethnicity affect prevalence and location of large polyps and tumors in average-risk individuals. Dr. Kuemmerle speaks with the first author of both articles, Dr. David A. Lieberman of Oregon Health & Science University; Plus, a rundown of top stories from this month's issue of GI and Hepatology News.

 

 

Lieberman DA, Holub JL, Morris CD, et al. Low Rate of Large Polyps (>9 mm) Within 10 Years After an Adequate Baseline Colonoscopy With No Polyps. Gastroenterology 2014; August; 147(2): 343-350
Abstract

 

Lieberman DA, Williams JL, Holub JL, et al. Race, Ethnicity, and Sex Affect Risk for Polyps >9 mm in Average-Risk Individua. Gastroenterology 2014; August; 147(2): 351–358
Abstract

 

 

Duration: 25.13m
Filetype: mp3
Bitrate: 96 KBPS
Frequency: 44100 HZ

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