Article

Most Baby Boomers Never Tested for Hepatitis C, Despite Being Most at Risk

 

- Survey of Baby Boomers Reveals Dangerous “It’s Not Me” Mentality About Hepatitis C 
 
- AGA Launches New Campaign to Address Threat 

 

Bethesda, MD (May 14, 2012) — Almost three-quarters (74 percent) of baby boomers (those born between 1945 and 1965) have never been tested or are unsure if they have been tested for hepatitis C, and 80 percent do not consider themselves at any risk for having the disease, according to a new survey by the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA). This lack of knowledge has significant implications — nearly 5 million Americans are infected with hepatitis C1 of which 82 percent2 are baby boomers, but three in four people infected don’t know they have it.3 Hepatitis C is the leading cause of liver failure, liver cancer or the need for a liver transplant in the U.S.4   
 
In addition to a lack of knowledge, the survey showed a lack of action: 83 percent of the baby boomers surveyed have never discussed hepatitis C with their health-care provider, even though it is diagnosed with a simple blood test and for many people, can be cured.5 Findings were released today by the AGA in advance of National Hepatitis Testing Day (May 19) to encourage baby boomers to talk to their health-care providers about getting tested—discussions that could potentially save lives. The survey of more than 1,000 baby boomers not previously diagnosed with hepatitis C was conducted online by Harris Interactive* on behalf of the AGA as part of a new educational campaign called I.D. Hep C.

“Many baby boomers have a potentially dangerous ‘it’s not me’ mentality about hepatitis C, and this survey underscores how poorly most people in that generation understand that risk factors do apply to them,” said Ira M. Jacobson, MD, AGAF, chief, division of gastroenterology and hepatology and professor of medicine, The Joan Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University, and physician co-advisor to AGA’s I.D. Hep C campaign. “Given the potentially deadly consequences of allowing hepatitis C to go undiagnosed, the AGA urges all baby boomers to talk to their doctors about getting tested.”  

To help combat the looming hepatitis C public health issue and address this knowledge gap, the AGA has launched I.D. Hep C, a new campaign to educate people, especially baby boomers, about hepatitis C and encourage them to speak up and get tested. By visiting www.IDHepC.org, people can learn more about hepatitis C and testing and get information on where to get tested — including free or low-cost screening events in some regions in the days surrounding National Hepatitis Testing Day (May 19). At www.IDHepC.org, the AGA is also encouraging people to show their commitment to stopping this silent killer by taking a virtual pledge to get tested and spread the word.

Hepatitis C is a serious liver disease that is spread through infected blood.6 Hepatitis C is responsible for about 15,000 deaths annually in the U.S., more than HIV.7 Liver damage from hepatitis C gets worse over time, and because many boomers have been infected for decades, the number of people who die from hepatitis C-related liver problems is expected to increase by 207 percent from 2000 to 2030.8

Survey Findings

The survey also revealed baby boomers are largely unaware of other important facts about hepatitis C:

  • Eighty-three percent of baby boomers don’t realize their generation is most likely to have hepatitis C.  Instead, half (52 percent) believe all age groups have a similar risk and nearly one quarter (24 percent) think those in Generation X (ages 31 to 46) are more likely to have the disease.
  • Fifty-five percent of baby boomers think every ethnic group has the same likelihood of having hepatitis C, even though African Americans and Hispanics are affected by hepatitis C at a significantly higher rate than the general population.9,10
  • Fewer than one in five (18 percent) baby boomers know that for many people, hepatitis C can be cured.

“The disease can’t be treated if people don’t know they are infected. With treatment, the chance of a cure is greater than ever,” said Michael Ryan, MD, clinical professor of medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, practicing gastroenterologist with Digestive and Liver Disease Specialists of Norfolk, VA, and physician co-advisor to AGA’s I.D. Hep C campaign. “I see every day the devastation hepatitis C can cause, especially to those who have lived with the disease for years without knowing it. Baby boomers shouldn’t wait – they should talk to their doctors today about getting this simple test.” 

About the Survey Methodology*

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Interactive on behalf of the AGA and Vertex from April 913, 2012, among 1,006 baby boomers (born between 1945 and 1965) not previously diagnosed with hepatitis C.

Additional survey findings are available at www.IDHepC.org.

About the Campaign

I.D. Hep C isa new campaign to educate people, especially baby boomers, about hepatitis C and encourage them to speak up and get tested to learn their status. By visiting www.IDHepC.org, people can take a virtual pledge to learn more and educate others about hepatitis C and testing and get information on where to get tested — including free or low-cost screening events in some regions in the days leading up to and following National Hepatitis Testing Day (May 19). At www.IDHepC.org, the AGA is also encouraging people to show their commitment to stopping this silent killer by taking a virtual pledge to get tested and spread the word. This campaign is funded by Vertex.

About Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis C virus, which is spread through direct contact with the blood of infected people and ultimately affects the liver. Chronic hepatitis C can lead to serious and life-threatening liver problems, including liver damage, cirrhosis, liver failure or liver cancer. Though many people with hepatitis C may not experience symptoms, others may have symptoms such as fatigue, fever, jaundice and abdominal pain.6

People who are at risk for hepatitis C include:

  • People born between born between 1945 and 1965.
  • People who had blood transfusions or organ transplants before 1992.
  • People with tattoos or body piercings.
  • People who used intravenous drugs, even once.
  • People who work in a health-care setting.
  • People with HIV.4

Unlike HIV and hepatitis B virus, for many people, chronic hepatitis C can be cured.5 More than 170 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C.11 In the U.S., up to 5 million people have chronic hepatitis C1 and 75 percent of them are unaware of their infection.3 Hepatitis C is five times more prevalent in the U.S. compared to HIV.12 The majority of people with hepatitis C in the U.S. were born between 1945 and 1965, accounting for 82 percent of all people with the disease.2 In the U.S., hepatitis C is the leading cause of liver transplantations4 and is reported to contribute to 15,000 deaths annually.7

About the AGA Institute

The American Gastroenterological Association is the trusted voice of the GI community. Founded in 1897, the AGA has grown to include 17,000 members from around the globe who are involved in all aspects of the science, practice and advancement of gastroenterology. The AGA Institute administers the practice, research and educational programs of the organization. www.gastro.org.

Like AGA on Facebook.
Join AGA on LinkedIn.
Follow us on Twitter @AmerGastroAssn; include our campaign hashtag: #IDHepC.
Check out our videos on YouTube.

###

1Chak, E, et. al. Hepatitis C Virus Infection In USA: An Estimate of True Prevalence. Liver Intl. 2011;1096 -1098.

2 Smith BD, et al. Hepatitis C virus antibody prevalence, correlates and predictors among persons born from 1945 through 1965 United States, 1999-2008. Abstract #394. Presented at: American Association for the Study of Liver Disease 2011 Annual Meeting; San Francisco, CA; November 5, 2011.

3Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Hepatitis and liver cancer: a national strategy for prevention and control of hepatitis B and C. Colvin HM and Mitchell AE, ed. Updated January 11, 2010. Available at: http://www.iom.edu/Reports/2010/Hepatitis-and-Liver-Cancer-A-National-Strategy-for-Prevention-and-Control-of-Hepatitis-B-and-C.aspx. Accessed May 3, 2012.

4Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public. June 9, 2009. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/C/cFAQ.htm. Accessed May 3, 2012.

5Pearlman BL and Traub N. Sustained Virologic Response to Antiviral Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Cure and So Much More. Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Apr;52(7):889-900.

6Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Hepatitis C Fact Sheet: CDC Viral Hepatitis. June 2010. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/HCV/PDFs/HepCGeneralFactSheet.pdf. Accessed May 3, 2012.

7Ly KN, et al. The Increasing Burden of Mortality From Viral Hepatitis in the United States Between 1999 and 2007. Ann Intern Med. 2012;156:271-278.

8Davis GL, Albright JE, Cook SF, Rosenberg DM. Projecting Future Complications of Chronic Hepatitis C in the United States Liver Transpl. 2003;4:331-8.

9Hepatitis C Support Coalition. Hepatitis C and Hispanics. 2006. Available at: http://www.hcvadvocate.org/hepatitis/factsheets_pdf/Hispanics.pdf  Accessed May 3, 2012. 

10Pearlman BL. Hepatitis C in African Americans. Clin Infect Dis. 2006;42:82-91.

11Ghany MG, Strader DB, Thomas DL, Seeff, LB. Diagnosis, management and treatment of hepatitis C; An update. Hepatology. 2009;49 (4):1-40.

12HCV Advocate. HIV/HCV Coinfection. March 2010. Available at: http://www.hcvadvocate.org/hepatitis/factsheets_pdf/HIV_HCV%20coinfecton_10.pdf. Accessed May 3, 2012.

36 out of 92 users found this page helpful.

Was this page helpful?