2014-01-02 16:38:28 UTC

GastroSlides Focus on Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension

Jan. 9, 2014

This month's images focus on the causes, diagnosis and management of cirrhosis and its most common complication — portal hypertension.

GastroSlides offers a comprehensive, growing collection of images on major GI and liver disease topics. Developed by internationally renowned authors, the images are a valuable resource to help you create high-quality presentations that explain the complex concepts and processes of digestive diseases.

This month's images focus on the causes, diagnosis and management of cirrhosis and its most common complication — portal hypertension — and are separated into the following sections:

  • Part I: Cirrhosis: Definition, Natural History and Diagnosis
  • Part II: Pathophysiology and Types of Portal Hypertension
  • Part III: Hyperdynamic Circulatory State
  • Part IV: Varices and Variceal Hemorrhage
  • Part V: Ascites
  • Part VI: Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis
  • Part VII: Hepatorenal Syndrome
  • Part VIII: Hepatic Encephalopathy
  • Part IX: Hepatopulmonary Syndrome
  • Part X: Portopulmonary Hypertension
  • Part XI: Liver Transplant

Order these slides individually as you need them or purchase a one-year subscription and have access to the entire GastroSlides library of more than 4,000 images. Preview and order slides.

Special offer: get your free download of the GastroSlides unit on liver cancer (revised).

GastroSlides is a continuing education resource directed by the AGA Institute Education and Training Committee.

More on Cirrhosis

Attend the AGA Postgraduate Course for Practical, Take Home Information

Feb. 12, 2018

Join us on June 2-3 in Washington, D.C. This course is held in conjunction with Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018.

Blog: Diagnosis, Pathogenesis and Treatment of Hepatorenal Syndrome in Patients With Cirrhosis

Jan. 30, 2018

New concepts and developments for diagnosis and assessment of renal function in patients with cirrhosis. Read more on the AGA Journals Blog.

Image Challenge: Cullen's Sign

Jan. 22, 2018

What caused a 56-year-old man with a previous history of cirrhosis to present with a large volume of ascites and periumbilical ecchymosis?