2014-12-09 17:07:53 UTC

Most Patients With Celiac Disease Are Not At Risk for Fertility Problems

Dec. 11, 2014

Reporting in Gastroenterology, Nafeesa N. Dhalwani and colleagues find that women with celiac disease do not have a greater likelihood of clinically recorded fertility problems than women without celiac disease. However, there were slightly higher reports of fertility problems for women diagnosed with celiac disease between the ages of 25 and 29.

Studies have associated infertility with celiac disease. However, these included small numbers of women attending infertility specialist services and subsequently screened for celiac disease, and therefore may not have been representative of the general population. Nafeesa N. Dhalwani and colleagues performed a large population-based study of infertility and celiac disease in women from the U.K. Reporting in Gastroenterology, they find that women with celiac disease do not have a greater likelihood of clinically recorded fertility problems than women without celiac disease, either before or after diagnosis, except for higher reports of fertility problems between 25–29 years if diagnosed with celiac disease. These findings should assure most women with celiac disease that they do not have an increased risk for fertility problems.

Gastroenterology 2014: 147(6): 1267-1274.e1

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