2017-01-02 20:56:24 UTC

New Section in CGH: Research Correspondence

Jan. 3, 2017

Check out the journal’s newest section, which includes concise and smaller scientific reports of original research studies.

Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology (CGH) is pleased to introduce a new section coined “Research Correspondence.” This section includes 750-word articles offering concise scientific reports of original research studies. Each article is broken down into four sections — introduction, methods, results and discussion. 

The January issue of CGH includes the following four Research Correspondence reports:

Prevalence of Celiac Disease Among Unsuspected Patients Presenting to Open Access Endoscopy
By Dimpal Bhakta, Clark Hair, Linda Green, Ngoc Duong, Aaron P. Thrift, Jennifer R. Kramer, Hashem B. El-Serag

Stooling Characteristics in Children with Irritable Bowel Syndrome
By Erica M. Weidler, Mariella M. Self, Danita I. Czyzewski, Robert J. Shulman, Bruno P. Chumpitazi

Hydroxycut-Related Vanishing Bile Duct Syndrome
By Abimbola Adike, Maxwell L. Smith, Amy Chervenak, Hugo E. Vargas

Perilipin Staining Distinguishes Between Steatosis and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Adults and Children
By Rotonya M. Carr, Ravindra Dhir, Kalyankar Mahadev, Megan Comerford, Naga P. Chalasani, Rexford S. Ahima

Stay tuned for additional Research Correspondence in each issue of CGH.

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Avoidance of Cow's Milk–Based Formula for At-Risk Infants Does Not Reduce Development of Celiac Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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Increased cow's milk antibody titers before the appearance of anti-TG2A and celiac disease indicates that subjects with celiac disease might have increased intestinal permeability in early life.