2015-02-24 22:03:15 UTC

Psychological Stress Increases Risk for Peptic Ulcer, Regardless of H. Pylori or Use of NSAIDs

Feb. 26, 2015

Susan Levenstein and colleagues report in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology that psychological stress increased the incidence of peptic ulcer, in part by influencing health-risk behaviors.

There is controversy over whether psychological stress contributes to development of peptic ulcers. Susan Levenstein and colleagues collected data on features of life stress and ulcer risk factors from a defined population in Denmark and compared these with findings of confirmed ulcers during the next 11 to 12 years. They report in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology that psychological stress increased the incidence of peptic ulcer, in part by influencing health-risk behaviors. Stress had similar effects on ulcers associated with H. pylori infection and those unrelated to either H. pylori or use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology 2015: 13(3): 498-506.e1

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