2014-11-18 20:27:02 UTC

Timing of Gluten Introduction In Infancy Doesn’t Matter

Nov. 20, 2014

The timing of introducing gluten into babies’ diets doesn’t alter their risk for developing celiac disease later, according to two separate reports published online last month in the New England Journal of Medicine. Read more on these findings in

The timing of introducing gluten into babies’ diets doesn’t alter their risk for developing celiac disease later, according to two separate reports published online last month in the New England Journal of Medicine

They found that neither introducing small amounts of gluten at four-to-six months of age nor delaying that introduction until 12 months of age reduced the risk of later celiac disease, and that breastfeeding status also did not significantly affect that risk.

For more information on these findings, visit GI & Hepatology News.

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