2012-09-04 13:40:05 UTC

Your AGA Research Foundation Gifts Foster Professional Growth

Sept. 6, 2012

Your AGA Research Foundation gifts support Yiyun Cao of the Illinois Math and Science Academy who received the 2012 AGA-Broad Student Research Fellowship Award. She has been able to work in the lab of Bana Jabri, MD, at the University of Chicago studying the regulation of RGS1 in celiac disease, gaining valuable experience in all the different aspects of science.

Yiyun Cao of the Illinois Math and Science Academy received the 2012 AGA-Broad Student Research Fellowship Award for research conducted at the University of Chicago.

“I am honored to be a recipient of the 2012 AGA-Eli & Edythe Broad Student Research Fellowship Award. In the past year, I have worked in the lab of Bana Jabri, MD, at the University of Chicago studying the regulation of RGS1 in celiac disease, and have gained valuable experience in all the different aspects of science: experimentation, reading literature, and writing about and presenting my work. The AGA-Broad fellowship will allow me to greatly expand on this foundation in an environment which I know to be highly conducive to my growth as a scientist. Overall, the award will benefit my goals of getting a graduate degree and working in biomedical research by providing me with the opportunity to gain more experience and independence in the laboratory.”

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