2015-04-10 19:37:39 UTC

IBD Self-Management: The AGA Guide to Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis (2nd Ed.)

Author Sunanda V. Kane, MD, MSPH, shares practical yet detailed information, including the latest IBD treatments, in a warm, compassionate tone that will motivate patients to successfully face life with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.

The second edition features a revised chapter on medications for IBD, offering the most up-to-date information on treatment currently available.

Dr. Kane’s book is a wonderful source of useful information and support to IBD patients and an outstanding contribution to the clinical literature for IBD physicians.”—Joseph B. Kirsner, MD, PhD

Right from the start, this is a terrific book. A lot of patients with IBD will read this book—and be happy they did!”—David Weinberg, MD, Minnesota Gastroenterology, Plymouth, MN

About the Author

Sunanda V. Kane, MD, MSPH
Sunanda V. Kan, MD, MSPH, is an internationally renowned authority on treatment of IBD who sees patients and conducts research at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. Dr. Kane lead education programs for IBD patients and their caregivers for groups like the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America (ccfa.org) and the Foundation for Clinical Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (myibd.org). She speaks around the the world to health-care professionals and encourages those with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis to understand their options and embrace their important role in managing their disease.

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