2015-05-18 18:12:28 UTC

ABIM Credit Offered at Tuesday’s MOC Course

May 18, 2015

Two-hour, self-study course will feature 30 questions from American Board of Internal Medicine.

This post originally appeared in DDW® Daily News

The AGA MOC Course, which takes place during Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2015 on May 19, 2015, will provide attendees the opportunity to earn 10 maintenance of certification (MOC) points through the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM). The two-hour, self-study course will feature 30 questions provided by ABIM with answers and clinical vignettes provided by AGA experts from around the country. A separate registration fee is required.

“The course this year will be a combination of quizzing — anonymously, through an audience response system — and some education,” said Robert C. Lowe, MD, associate professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine and educational director of gastroenterology at Boston Medical Center, MA. “We hope to hit upon the major points covered on the board exams that will be given later this year. The format is designed to give exam candidates a chance to review the latest ABIM question bank in an interactive format and, we hope, to get key pieces of information that will help guide them in their next board exam.”

Dr. Lowe is director of Tuesday’s course, which was designed around the AGA Institute Guidebook to ABIM Recertification 2014 module. He is also editor for the MOC review section and one of the AGA experts who has prepared answers and explanatory vignettes for the 2015 edition of this always-popular course.

Like the board exam itself, the review course will cover the GI tract from the esophagus to the colon and every major structure, disorder and dysfunction along the way. Attendees can expect questions on managing patients with esophageal disease, gastric cancer and other stomach disorders, pancreatic disorders, biliary tree disorders, liver cirrhosis, IBD, colon cancer and every GI organ in between.

The 30 questions were prepared by the same group of GI experts who create the ABIM exam in gastroenterology. The questions are representative of the current exam and provide insight into the board’s current thinking on a variety of important GI topics.

Current candidates for ABIM certification in gastroenterology should make time to attend Tuesday’s review session, Dr. Lowe said. Diplomates who are up for a repeat board exam this fall should also attend, while diplomates who face recertification in the next few years will benefit from starting the review process early, he added.

DDW® attendees who can’t make the live session can purchase the AGA Institute Guidebook to ABIM Recertification at the AGA Resource Center, and ABIM diplomates may request the ABIM Update in Gastroenterology through ABIM by going to www.abim.org. But the most effective way to prepare for the board exam is to attend the MOC review session, Dr. Lowe said.

“When you attend in person, you gain the opportunity to participate in an active learning session, which is the most effective way to retain material for most of us,” he explained. “These are answers devised by content experts from around the country with the added benefit of live interaction. The course will package the entire MOC review process in a more digestible form.”

Please refer to the schedule-at-a-glance in Tuesday’s issue for the time and location of this and other DDW events.

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