2015-02-19 13:56:13 UTC

AGA Partners with CDC to Fight Smoking & CRC

Feb. 26, 2015

New evidence is showing that smoking is linked to colorectal cancer. A new AGA partnership with CDC will help educate the public about this link.

AGA is excited to announce our partnership with CDC to educate the public on the risks of tobacco use and its link with colorectal cancer. 

We can’t share all the details just yet, but starting in March, CDC is planning to promote AGA tools and Web resources. This may increase the visibility of our GI locator service for patients who need colorectal cancer screening. Make sure you’re in the locator by updating your information online.

Edit your profile information on the “My AGA” page of the AGA website (log in required). Once there, you’ll be told whether you are currently included in the locator service. Click the link that allows you to opt in or out of the GI Locator Service. Contact member services for assistance.

The Surgeon General report, Health Consequences of Smoking — 50 Years of Progress, contains evidence that now proves smoking causes colorectal cancer.

Asking your patients about and counseling them on their tobacco use is a Physician Quality Reporting Program preventive measure. Helping your patients quit smoking benefits their health, as well as their loved ones and others around them. Many smokers want to quit, but need the support and motivation of those they trust, like their doctors. 

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